Raio Verde

Agosto 02 2012

«O sucesso é a capacidade de ir de erro em erro sem perder o entusiasmo.»

Churchill

publicado por raioverde às 12:32

Junho 20 2012

http://forteapache.blogs.sapo.pt/517515.html

publicado por raioverde às 12:24

Junho 08 2012

"O nosso sistema é muito bom, agora o abuso que dele é feito é que é muito mau", afirmou Cândida de Almeida.

publicado por raioverde às 09:52

Junho 04 2012
publicado por raioverde às 16:09

Junho 04 2012

"...contra a criminalização dos desempregados..."

 

publicado por raioverde às 15:54

Junho 01 2012

publicado por raioverde às 13:12

Maio 31 2012

http://archive.org/details/Winston_Churchill

 

 

 

Turning once again, and this time more generally, to the question of invasion, I would observe that there has never been a period in all these long centuries of which we boast when an absolute guarantee against invasion, still less against serious raids, could have been given to our people. In the days of Napoleon, of which I was speaking just now, the same wind which would have carried his transports across the Channel might have driven away the blockading fleet. There was always the chance, and it is that chance which has excited and befooled the imaginations of many Continental tyrants. Many are the tales that are told. We are assured that novel methods will be adopted, and when we see the originality of malice, the ingenuity of aggression, which our enemy displays, we may certainly prepare ourselves for every kind of novel stratagem and every kind of brutal and treacherous manœuvre. I think that no idea is so outlandish that it should not be considered and viewed with a searching, but at the same time, I hope, with a steady eye. We must never forget the solid assurances of sea power and those which belong to air power if it can be locally exercised.

I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once more able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war, and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government — every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength.

Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail.We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.

publicado por raioverde às 02:03

Maio 31 2012

 

 

I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to a college graduation. Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That’s it. No big deal. Just three stories.

The first story is about connecting the dots.

I dropped out of Reed College after the first six months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out?

It started before I was born. My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: “We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?” They said: “Of course.” My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college.

And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out okay. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned Coke bottles for the 5-cent deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the seven miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example:

Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.

None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But 10 years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, its likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards 10 years later.

Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something–your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.

My second story is about love and loss.

I was lucky–I found what I loved to do early in life. Woz and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20. We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees. We had just released our finest creation–the Macintosh–a year earlier, and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired. How can you get fired from a company you started? Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well. But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out. When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him. So at 30, I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.

I really didn’t know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down–that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the Valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me–I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.

I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife. Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film, “Toy Story,” and is now the most successful animation studio in the world. In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s current renaissance. And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.

I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.

My third story is about death.

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything–all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure–these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up, so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying, because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I’m fine now.

This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope its the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma–which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called “The Whole Earth Catalog,” which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960′s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: It was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of “The Whole Earth Catalog,” and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Thank you all very much.

publicado por raioverde às 01:49

Maio 29 2012

“Don’t piss down my back and tell me it’s raining.”

publicado por raioverde às 12:34

Maio 29 2012

http://forteapache.blogs.sapo.pt/481293.html

publicado por raioverde às 11:56

Maio 23 2012

"If you want a quality, act as if you already had it." William James

publicado por raioverde às 12:35

Maio 21 2012

http://corta-fitas.blogs.sapo.pt/4876752.html

publicado por raioverde às 16:53

Maio 21 2012

Não permitas que o ruído das opiniões dos outros abafe a tua voz interior. Tem a coragem de seguir o teu coração e a tua intuição.»

publicado por raioverde às 11:42

Maio 16 2012

‎"We far more often limit our possibilities by aiming too low rather than too high. (Diogo was always saying ‘lets put a man on the moon!!')"


publicado por raioverde às 12:52

Março 16 2012

‎'A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity. An optimistic sees the opportunity in every difficulty.' Winston Churchill

publicado por raioverde às 16:37

Dezembro 30 2011

Em super altas

publicado por raioverde às 12:54

Dezembro 30 2011

Ontem foi dia de publicação de pelo menos 8  famigeradas lei orgânicas dos Ministérios.

publicado por raioverde às 12:48

Dezembro 29 2011

Sexta feira dia 23 de Dezembro, Castelo Branco

 

Um cliente, tendo-se previamente informado dos horários,  compra um bilhete para um autocarro Castelo Branco Coimbra numa loja com esses terminais de venda.

 

Chega à hora, e o autocarro(por sinal o último) não existe!!!!!!!!!!

 

Irritado e fulo, sai disparado, e volta a entrar, mais calmo, para pedir outras informações.

 

com muita sorte arranja uma boleia de quem ainda não tinha saído da cidade.

 

Enquanto espera pela boleia, vai a um café, vê um placard com uns comes. Pede uma sandes mista(não havia de tudo o resto que estava lá escrito), mas depois repara que pode ser tosta...

 

"Pode-me tostar a sandes?"

 

" Não! Que isto demora muito tempo a aquecer"

 

Entretanto, entra uma pessoa conhecida  e o cliente defraudado conta a história do autocarro. 

Eis senão que esta pessoa conhecida conta que uma amiga de Guimarães já comprou bilhetes para Guimarães e que depois chegado ao Porto(onde deveria trocar de autocarro), já não havia a ligação para Guimarães. Não houve atraso. simplesmente não havia.

Gato escaldado de água fria tem medo, e da vez seguinte, tratou de perguntar se tinham a certeza que existia esse autocarro. Resposta afirmativa.

 

Chegou ao Porto, a mesma coisa.

 

Porto que, por sua vez, tem a estação de autocarros mais estrambólica que já vi. uma confusão de autocarros e pessoas, num espaço exíguo, sem indicação electrónica e o altifalante não se percebe. Resultado: confusão generalizada e ansiedade(quase pior que a espera da nota de um exame) sempre que se vai apanhar um autocarro.

 

 

publicado por raioverde às 19:00

Dezembro 11 2011

European paradise:

You are invited to an official lunch. You are welcomed by an Englishman. Food is prepared by a Frenchman and an Italian puts you in the mood and everything is organised by a German.

European hell:

You are invited to an official lunch. You are welcomed by a Frenchman. Food is prepared by an Englishman, German puts you in the mood but, don't worry, everything is organised by an Italian.

publicado por raioverde às 21:30

Dezembro 10 2011
publicado por raioverde às 01:07

Dezembro 06 2011

"Paulo Macedo:Há um conjunto de factores que eu imputo essencialmente à Gestão e às lideranças.

 

Fátima Campos Ferreira: E, portanto há melhores lideranças a Norte do que a Sul?

 

Paulo Macedo:Tem-se verificado em algumas áreas, aliás em muitas áreas, devo-lhe dizer que não é só na Saúde que isso várias vezes acontece" 

publicado por raioverde às 00:34

Dezembro 05 2011

'Não entendo porque não se fala em sanções para quem tem excedentes e não os coloca ao serviço da economia."

publicado por raioverde às 11:10

Dezembro 05 2011

Other elements might follow, but the sequencing matters.

publicado por raioverde às 11:06

Dezembro 05 2011

Mrs Merkel is clear: independent institutions, free from political interference, are essential for credibility. Preserving the independence of, for example, the courts and the ECB, is “for the highest good of our democracy”. On the question of budgetary rules and sanctions, she says:

"There must be no political leeway when it comes to determining whether the limits are violated or not. There must be real automaticity."

 

A caminho do Federalismo.

publicado por raioverde às 10:58

Dezembro 04 2011

http://www.ncr-iran.org/en/ncri-statements/terrorism/11437-iran-regimes-highest-missile-commander-killed-in-explosion

publicado por raioverde às 13:04

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